Along the Air Line... 2022 - Spring, Part 21
The Air Line Trail in Eastern Connecticut - Stan Malcolm Photos

HOME: Air Line...
2022 Pages Menu
Stan's FlickR Albums
SmugMug Albums

 

 

June 12th. Deer Fly (Chrysops sp.) season has begun. This is the pointy pierce and suck end.

 

 

One of two Great Blue Herons (Ardea herodias) this morning.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

June 13th. Eastern Kingbird (Tyrannus tyrannus).

 

 

 

 

 

The carapace of a very large Snapping Turtle (Chelydra serpentina).

 

 

Neck stretched way out at the right.

 

 

A very bold Painted Turtle (Chrysemys picta) briefly resting against the snapper's submerged neck.

 

 

The snapper briefly raised its head...

 

 

...before submerging completely and moving off (based on ripples and a bubble trail).

 

 

Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia).

 

 

Whorled Loosestrife (Lysimachia quadrifolia).

 

 

 

 

 

Little Wood-satyr (Megisto cymela).

 

 

Cow Vetch (Vicia cracca).

 

 

A young Eastern Cottontail (Sylvilagus floridanus) on the Colchester Spur. Maybe drying out in the sun after showers overnight... or "anting" like birds will do to allow ants to forage on for ectoparasites on their bodies.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Some brushing up.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

East of Route 207, a few Fragrant Water-lilies (Nymphaea odorata) have started blooming.)

 

 

I count 15 Painted Turtles (Chrysemys picta) in this photo.

 

 

 

 

 

Swamp-honeysuckle - actually an Azalea (Rhododendron viscosum).

 

 

 

 

 

June 14th. An afternoon stop at Cranberry Bog. A male Red-winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus) sitting on a powerline beside the marsh, exactly as he did when I saw him there one week ago.

 

 

Once again, he was calling to his young which were hopping about on the lily pads, hunting insects.

 

 

Last week, one of the young seemed to have a stick in its mouth. Now I realize it must have been a Damselfly, as this week's "stick" turned out to be.

 

 

In just a week, the Canada Goose (Branta canadensis) goslings have developed most of their adult plumage.

 

 

The only sign I see of their "youth" is a light patch on their foreheads.

 

 

Note the new wing feathers coming in near this adult bird's rump.

 

 

Sweet Peas (Lathyrus odoratus) have just begun to bloom.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

June 15th. Green Frog (Rana clamitans).

 

 

June 16th. Common Milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) blossoms have started to open.