Along the Air Line... 2021 - Fall, Part 1
The Air Line Trail in Eastern Connecticut - Stan Malcolm Photos

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September 23rd. Looks like Destroying Angel (Amanita virosa).

 

 

I took a brief detour to the Pollinator Garden off Kinney Road in Hebron, located at the Raymonmd Brook Reserve's parking area.

 

 

In the afternoon I walked east from Cook Hill Road in Lebanon. Where are all the cattle normally in this barnyard?

 

 

Ah, they've come further east to the little pond opposite the marsh outlet.

 

 

I saw nine or ten animals.

 

 

Purple Thorn-apple or Jimsonweed (Datura stramonium var. tatula). Poisonous.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Country or Indian Mallow (Abutilon indicum). See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abutilon_indicum

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common Mallow or Cheeses (Malva neglecta).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Clouded Sulphur (Colias philodice).

 

 

 

 

 

Cabbage White (Pieris rapae).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bumble Bee (Bombus sp.) on Red Clover (Trifolium praetense).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Honey Bee (Apis mellifera).

 

 

 

 

 

Square-headed Wasp (Ectemnius sp.).

 

Great Golden Digger Wasp (Sphex ichneumoneus).

 

 

Digger Wasp (Monobia sp.).

 

 

A Cutworm moth (Feltia sp.).

 

 

 

 

 

Unidentified caterpillar (probably Geometridae) on Spotted Knapweed (Centaurea maculosa).

 

 

 

 

 

A female Meadowhawk dragonfly (Sympetrum sp.).

 

 

Calico Asters (Symphyotrichum lateriflorum) and Senasitive Fern (Onoclea sensibilis).

 

 

Winterberry (Ilex verticillata).

 

 

 

 

 

September 25th. Fog lifting to reveal a sunny day at 50 degrees.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Spiderwebs covered in dew, with Winterberry (Ilex verticillata).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The sink hole is back. DEEP's repair just days ago was washed away by yesterday's rain. The hole must lead directly to the channel.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Canada Geese (Branta canadensis) arrived just as I was walking back.

 

 

September 26th. I used to assume this was the Emetic Russula (Russula emetica) but several other Russulas look very similar. None should be eaten. Hint "emetica".

 

 

Most likely an Amanita sp.

 

 

 

 

 

Hydnellum sp., a Tooth Fungus. (Thanks Terry!)