Along the Air Line... 2019-2020 - Winter, Part 14
The Air Line Trail in Eastern Connecticut - Stan Malcolm Photos

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March 11th. Moon, just past full.

 

 

Morning Dove (Zenaida macroura).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Selfie in the whirlpool.

 

 

 

 

 

Canada Goose (Branta canadensis).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alder (Alnus sp.) catkins about ready to open and broadcast their pollen.

 

 

Same afternoon; a brief stop at Cranberry Bog in East Hampton. Wood Frogs (Rana sylvatica) active there.

 

 

 

 

 

A bit further east, I heard Spring Peepers (Hyla (Pseudacris) crucifer) but couldn't see them.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note the frog egg masses in the foreground.

 

 

 

 

 

A quick visit to the barnyard just to the east of the bog. Sheep!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

March 12th. Late afternoon. Ring-necked Ducks (Aythya collaris) at the pond east of Route 207.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Still no activity at last year's Great Blue Heron nest.

 

 

One resident pair of Canada Geese (Branta canadensis).

 

 

Skunk Cabbage (Symplocarpus foetidus) is at it's peak.

 

 

The maroon sheath is called the spathe. It surrounds the round spadix which in turn supports the tiny yellow flowers.

 

 

Back at Raymond Brook Marsh, a pair of Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos).

 

 

A Dragonfly nymph, rescued from the trail surface where I think it was left by a boy hunting turtles with a large net. Order Odonata; I think family Gomphidae. They burrow and hide in bottom sediments.

 

 

March 13th. A mostly cloudy afternoon walk east from Old Hartford Road to Judd Brook. Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis).

 

 

 

 

 

Frodo ("aFRO DOg").

 

 

 

 

 

After the rain, moss was in it's glory.

 

 

A pair of Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) on one of the vernal pools. Wood Frogs were pretty quiet, except when the sun came out.

 

 

Intersecting Wood Frog ripples reflecting the wioods beyond gave an ever-changing stained glass effect to the surface.

 

 

 

 

 

With Wood Frog (Rana sylvatica).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Partridgeberry (Mitchella repens).

 

 

One Spotted Turtle (Clemmys guttata) was out basking.