Along the Air Line... 2020 - Spring, Part 23
The Air Line Trail in Eastern Connecticut - Stan Malcolm Photos

HOME: Air Line...
2020 Pages Menu
Stan's FlickR Albums
SmugMug Albums

 

 

June 11th. Pasture or Carolina Rose (Rosa carolina). Lots of blossoms open now.

 

 

The flowers look identical to those of Swamp Rose, but today I confirmed the key differences: straight spines and stipules not narrow.

 

 

June 12th. Pretty sure this is a Great Crested Flycatcher (Myiarchus crinitus), a bird I've never seen before. Lousy photo, but nest material in its mouth so maybe I'll see it again.

 

 

Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) on the channel side.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eastern Cottontail (Sylvilagus floridanus).

 

 

A Painted Turtle (Chrysemys picta) sitting where the heron was a few minutes earlier.

 

 

June 13th. The male Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) that is at the marsh most mornings.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hop Clover (Trifolium agrarium).

 

 

Common or Philadelphia Fleabane (Erigeron philadelphicus).

 

 

 

 

 

Ebony Jewelwing damselfly (Calopteryx maculatum).

 

 

A Flower Fly (Family Syrphidae).

 

 

A Crambid moth (Family Crambidae), perhaps one of the species with aquatic caterpillars.

 

 

The silken home of a Pistol Casebearer moth larva (Family Coleophoridae, Coleophora sp.).

 

 

A Sixspotted Orbweaver spider (Araniella displicata).

 

 

 

 

 

The six spots are on the upper side of the abdomen.

 

 

June 14th. A Veery (Catharus fuscescens) at the spur junction where I've seen them before.

 

 

At first I though I was seeing a young Mourning Dove (Zenaida macruora) but it was only the fluffed feathers of the adult.

 

 

Common Mullein (Verbascum thapsus) flowers have started opening.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hard to see, but that's one of two Cedar Waxwings (Bombycilla cedrorum) exploring what I think is an abandoned catbird nest.

 

 

In this photo, the bird has a bit of nest material in its beak. Adding it to the nest, or absconding with it to build its own nest elsewhere?

 

 

 

 

 

Tail up like it was settling in, but note the blue sky poking through holes in the nest below.

 

 

Elsewhere, a waxwing more or less in the open.

 

 

 

 

 

June 15th. Two Tree Swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) perched at Raymond Brook Marsh.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ornamental Iris at the Route 85 trail head.