Along the Air Line... 2019 - Spring, Part 2
The Air Line Trail in Eastern Connecticut - Stan Malcolm Photos

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March 26th.  An afternoon walk east from Old Hartford Road.  Mated Wood Frogs (Rana sylvatica) in a trailside ditch.

 

 

I wonder if the females are starting to show up.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Through the rock cut...

 

 

 

 

 

...where the moss was outstanding...

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

...and the trailside ditch was thick with filamentous algae.

 

 

 

 

 

The vernal pool just before the Judd Brook bridge was full of Wood Frogs in chorus.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

March 27th.  Canada Goose (Branta canadensis).  One of a pair.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Early afternoon, not far from the River Road bridge.  Soft moist moss.  Sphagnum sp.?

 

 

Pink Earth Lichen (Dibaeis baeomyces).

 

 

March 28th. Canada Goose (Branta canadensis).

 

 

 

 

 

Painted Turtle (Chrysemys picta).

 

 

Best guess, dried up slime mold fruiting bodies. In fact, most likely Trichia sp. (Thanks, Terry) and I'd put a small bet on Trichia decipiens.

 

 

 

 

 

Boiler slag left over from the days of steam on the railroad.

 

 

Another piece.

 

 

A Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodius), far across the marsh.

 

 

Same photo, closer crop.

 

 

March 30th. Common Grackle (Quiscalus quiscula).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One of many Wood Frogs (Rana sylvatica) in chorus, east of Old Hartford Road.

 

 

 

 

 

Ripples radiating from frogs calling or swimming.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Female flower of American Hazelnut (Corylus americana). At 3mm or so, perhaps the smallest flower I've photographed.

 

 

Female flowers are produced alone above the male catkins, then adjacent to the catkins...

 

 

...and then still further down, the male catkins are alone.

 

 

Mourning Cloak (Nymphalis antiopa). A particularly fresh example, considering that it overwintered as an adult.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

March 31st. A male Wood Duck (Aix sponsa).

 

 

They are incredible looking.