Along the Air Line... 2016 - Spring, Part 8
The Air Line Trail in Eastern Connecticut - Stan Malcolm Photos

mHome Page
Stan Malcolm Photo

 

 

June 15th. Depford Pinks (Dianthus armeria) have begun to bloom.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blue-eyed Grass (Sisyrinchium sp.).

 

 

Deer Flies (Chrysops sp.) are out.  Next time you swat one, have a look at the irridescent patterned eyes.

 

 

Check out the evil piercing beak.

 

 

I lingered by a recently discovered nest, but saw no activity at it.

 

 

The female Baltamore Oriole (Icterus galbula) at the nest above the trail.

 

 

Looking around...

 

 

 

 

 

... and looking for food?

 

 

 

 

 

She left and the male came in, also seeming to forage by the nest.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Red-winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus) female approaching her nest.

 

 

The female Eastern Kingbird (Tyrannus tyrannus) on the nest...

 

 

...and taking a break to stretch?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

June 17th.  Swamp-Honeysuckle, an Azalea (Rhododendron viscosum).

 

 

 

 

 

First Common Milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) I've seen in bloom this year.

 

 

 

 

 

Cedar Waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

First Fragrant Water-Lily (Nymphaea odorata) in bloom.

 

 

A female Black-winged Damselfly (Calopteryx maculata).  Female wings have white stigmas near the tips and a black or dull bronze body.  Male stigmas are black and their bodies are a brilliant metallic green.

 

 

 

June 18th.  Is that a little beak on the Eastern Kingbird (Tyrannus tyrannus) nest?

 

 

Yup.

 

 

And another one.

 

 

June 19th.  The female Red-winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus) hopped off her nest for a photo.

 

 

One of the Frostweeds (Crocanthemum sp.).

 

 

A large developing puffball, I think, with shadows of a peppergrass on it.

 

 

June 20th.  Carolina or Pasture Rose (Rosa carolina).

 

 

 

 

 

Finally caught a bird on an empty nest I've been watching.  It's an American Robin (Turdus migratorius) based on yellow beak, eye ring, and white "underpants".

 

 

No little beaks showing on the Eastern Kingbird (Tyrannus tyrannus) nest, but the male was on guard above so all is well.