Along the Air Line... 2013 - Spring, Part 2
The Air Line Trail in Eastern Connecticut - Stan Malcolm Photos

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Stan Malcolm Photo

 

 

April 8th.  One of two Beavers (Castor canadensis) bringing sticks and mud to strengthen their dam.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

An afternoon visit to the heron roost east of Cook Hill Road.  Four of the seven nests were occupied today.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blowin' in the wind.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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A long video (nearly 7 minutes); mostly grooming and some display posturing starting at 1 minute, 10 seconds.

 

 

 

 

 

April 9th.  With Naturalist Juan Sanchez as my guide, I explored the Joshua's Trust Atlantic White Cedar Bog which abuts the Air Line Trail in Windham.  For many more pictures taken at the cedar bog and a nearby stand of Pitch Pine (Pinus rigida),
see: http://www.performance-vision.com/JoshuasTrust/

 

 

Also seen along the trail was this Eastern Comma (Polygonia comma)...

 

 

...and this Northern Water Snake (Nerodia sipedon).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

April 10th.  Several pair of Ring-necked Ducks (Aythya collaris) are at the marsh east of Route 207.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In the same area, I saw this male Yellow-rumped "Myrtle" Warbler (Dendroica coronata)...

 

 

...and this Palm Warbler (Dendroica palmarum).

 

 

April 11th.  A Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodius) caught a catfish, and dunked/stabbed it a number of times before coaxing it down the hatch (see video below).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A pair of Wood Ducks (Aix sponsa) perched high and far away, hopefully scouting for a hollow tree nesting site.

 

 

 

 

 

Sharing an opinion?

 

 

April 13th.  Skunk Cabbage (Symplocarpus foetidus) leaves are expanding fast as maroon flower spathes shrivel at the base.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trout-lily (Erythronium americanum) leaves add green to moist forest floors.

 

 

Morrow's Honeysuckle (Lonicera morrowii) is leafing out.

 

 

Red Maple (Acer rubrum) flowers took a beating in yesterday's rain but still add a tint of pink to the forests.