Along the Air Line... 2010 - Fall, Part 5
The Air Line Trail in Eastern Connecticut - Stan Malcolm Photos

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Stan Malcolm Photo

 

 

October 27th. Grayville Falls.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A brief afternoon visit to Cranberry Bog in East Hampton.

 

 

 

 

 

Cattails (Typha latifolia).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beech leaves are distinctive in the Fall.

 

 

November 2nd. An American Coot (Fulica americana) just passing through.

 

 

 

 

 

November 3rd.  Pre-dawn.  Heavy frost at 27 degrees.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Geese approaching...

 

 

...and landing to join others on the marsh.

 

 

Soon, they all took off for breakfast at a nearby corn field.

 

 

November 6th.  Poor light to capture this Red-tailed Hawk, puffed for warmth.

 

 

A flock of European Starlings and/or Cowbirds passing overhead.  Their calls were audible long before the birds were visible.

 

 

 

 

 

Lots of Canada Geese on the marsh, preparing for flight.

 

 

And they're off!

 

 

Lots of enthusiasm for today's Ghost Run.  Wonder how many high jumps this fellow will have left at the East Hampton finish line. (Answer: None, but he finished strong.)

 

 

A good turnout on an overcast and seasonally cool day.

 

 

Links to nearly 500 of my photos and official race results HERE.

 

 

November 8th. First snow: a heavy inch that should soon melt away.

 

 

Glad it didn't fall on the Ghost Runners just two days ago.  However, based on footprints' length of stride, there was a runner out ahead of me on the trail this morning.  Dedication!

 

 

November 9th. A male Bufflehead (Bucephala albeola), a rare visitor passing through the marsh.

 

 

November 11th.  Canada Geese (Branta canadensis) are still passing through.

 

 

Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) are mostly resident, though they retreat to rare patches of flowing water in the worst of winter.

 

 

The American Coot (Fulica americana) first spotted on November 2nd is still around, hanging out with the Mallards.  (Though I suppose it could be a different one.)

 

 

A statue-like White-tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus).  Until its ears moved, I thought it might have been a decoy.

 

 

 

 

 

Cattails (Typha latifolia) in silhouette.

 

 

 

 

 

November 12th. Once again, the visiting American Coot (Fulica americana).