Along the Air Line... 2009 - Spring, Part 9
The Air Line Trail in Eastern Connecticut - Stan Malcolm Photos

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Stan Malcolm Photo

 

 

May 30th. Male Black-winged Damselfly (Calopteryx maculatum).

 

 

 

 

 

A Red-spotted Purple (Limenitis arthemis astyanax).

 

 

Froth produced by a Meadow Spittlebug (Philaenus spumarius) nymph.

 

 

The nymph (or what's left of it) appears below the froth. The froth is meant to protect the nymphs but seems to have failed in this case.

 

 

A Leaf-footed Bug (Acanthocephala sp. of the Family Coreidae).

 

 

Eastern Tent Caterpillars (Malacosoma americana) are nearly full sized now.

 

 

A Stinkpot (Sternothaerus odoratus).

 

 

Spotted Turtle (Clemmys guttata). Various healed wounds to the shell speak to a tough life.

 

 

June 1st. This Eastern Comma (Polygonia comma) shows a bird-pecked hind wing, the result of a narrow escape. The undersides of the Comma's wings resemble a dead leaf.

 

 

A Skipper (Family Hesperiidae) on Wild Geranium.

 

 

June 2nd. A White-tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus) buck.

 

 

Antler "buds" are showing. Still shedding his winter coat.

 

 

A clump of Larger Blue Flags (Iris versicolor).

 

 

June 3rd. Snapping Turtles (Chelydra serpentina) are laying eggs - in this case using a hole dug directly in the trail surface.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

June 4th. American Hornbeam (Carpinus caroliniana). Often in new leaves, red pigments develop first, then are overwhelmed and hidden by the green that soon follows. (In fall, the sequence is reversed.)

 

 

Several more Snapping Turtles (Chelydra serpentina) were laying eggs this morning.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bracken (Pteridium aquilinum).

 

 

Ocellate or Eyespot galls on Red Maple (Acer rubrum). These galls are formed by the larvae of tiny midges (Acericecis ocellaris).

 

 

Rarely noticed, these colorful but small flowers are on...

 

 

...Poison Ivy (Toxicodendron radicans).

 

 

June 5th. Multiflora rose (Rosa multiflora). Terrific scent along the trail.

 

 

 

 

 

This spiny "dragon" will grow up to be a Ladybird Beetle (Family Coccinelidae).

 

 

June 7th.

 

 

(Can anyone suggest a layman's guide to common grasses in Connecticut?)

 

 

Tulip Poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera).

 

 

Maple-leafed Viburnum (Viburnum acerifolium).

 

 

A Cuckoo Bee, Skipper, and Weevil on Rubus sp.

 

 

Multiflora rose (Rosa multiflora).