(Mostly) Moths on Milkweed - July 5, 2013
Stan Malcolm Photos - Marlborough, Connecticut

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July 5th.  Marlborough, Hartford County, Connecticut - 6:30-6:45 AM.

05-01-IMG_0805-export-screen.jpg  A Crane Fly (Family Tipulidae).  Early morning visitor or night visitor that stayed behind?

 

 

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05-03-IMG_0806-export-screen-2.jpg  Note the "normal" short beak, unlike the "elephant fly" of July 2nd (and again on the evening of July 5th - see below).  The blue-green eyes are striking - and probably not preserved in dead specimens.

 

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July 5th.  Marlborough, Hartford County, Connecticut - 9:45-10:30 PM.

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05-15-IMG_0888-export-screen.jpg  Speranza pustularia

 

 

05-16-IMG_0890-export-screen.jpg  Speranza pustularia

 

 

05-17-IMG_0835-export-screen.jpg  Speranza pustularia

 

 

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05-20-IMG_0826-export-screen.jpg  Right: Condylolomia participalis.

 

 

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05-24-IMG_0816-export-screen.jpg  Dave:  Pyrausta signatalis?

 

 

05-25-IMG_0851-export-screen.jpg  Halysidota tessallaris.  Banded Tussock Moth.

 

 

05-26-IMG_0853-export-screen.jpg  Halysidota tessallaris.  Banded Tussock Moth.

 

 

05-27-IMG_0822-export-screen.jpg  Dave: Pyrausta acrionalis?

 

 

05-28-IMG_0833-export-screen.jpg  Condylolomia participalis.

 

 

05-29-IMG_0831-export-screen.jpg  Condylolomia participalis.

 

 

05-30-IMG_0859-export-screen.jpg  Condylolomia participalis.

 

 

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05-42-IMG_0828-export-screen.jpg  Another (or the same?) Crane Fly, Elephantomyia westwoodi, in the family Limoniidae as seen on July 2nd.  That beak is amazing!

 

 

05-43-IMG_0828-export-screen-2.jpg  Elephantomyia westwoodi.

 

 

05-44-IMG_0871-export-screen.jpg  Elephantomyia westwoodi.

 

 

05-45-IMG_0871-export-screen-2.jpg  Elephantomyia westwoodi.  Note the palps at the end of the beak.

 

 

05-46-IMG_0872-export-screen.jpg  Elephantomyia westwoodi.  I was able to watch through the viewfinder as the fly probed and withdrew its beak.  All the positioning is done with the legs moving the whole body up and down.  Seems like quite a feat of nervous coordination between brain and thoracic ganglia - in a fly with a body length similar to the breadth of a single milkweed blossom.  This is the "down" position...

 

 

05-47-IMG_0873-export-screen.jpg  Elephantomyia westwoodi.  ...and this is near the maximum "up" position.